Whims and Air Benders: The Current Style Trends of the Craft Center

Throw, bisque, and glaze. This is the common path for many pottery pieces, and while the results are often beautiful, they can be a bit limited in showing the true personality and style of the artist.


Art and Sculpture: Two Sides of the Same Coin 

450px-ancient_greek_pottery_in_the_national_archaeological_museum_in_athens_13
(Source:Sailko, 2008)

 

For hundreds of years, humans have been carving, painting, pressing and applying patterns and art to pottery pieces. The practice makes the piece one of double art mediums: the piece itself, and the art that is put onto it. The ancient Greeks and Egyptians depicted gods and goddesses, medieval artists depicted saints and holy figures, and all earlier civilizations depicted scenes of everyday life. We, of course, are no different!

In conclusion, then, we may say that not only has Greek pottery given us some of the most distinctive, influential, and beautiful shapes and designs of antiquity but it has also given us a window into the lives, practices, and beliefs of a people long gone and of whom we very often have no contemporary written record. – Mark Cartwright, the Ancient History Encyclopedia

Of course, my depictions may be a bit less religious in nature, unless of course, you consider Avatar the Last Airbender  a religion. In which case, we’d be very good friends.

My Art and Depictions

So a small tidbit about me: my mind and imagination is usually a weird wonderland, and I see magic and fantastic things all around me. This naturally translates into my art, and recently I’ve been on a fantasy and fandom kick.

I’ve been on a fandom kick for a particular show: Avatar: The Last Airbender. This show ran in the early 2000s, and chronicles the journey of a young element bender to save and unify his world. Ever since an ex of mine introduced me, I’ve been hooked on this absolutely beautiful show, and my nerdiness knows no bounds.

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Thisimg_0105 piece was thrown on the wheel and then hand carved with the designs, using a tool called the sgraffito. Colored slip (watered down clay) was then painted onto the figures, and bisque fired. This particular piece now awaits clear glaze.

The baby piece next to it is my second in this series, and awaits the colored slip application! This is a trend I cannot wait to see continue.

For those of you who may not know clay and pottery terminology, fret not: my next post will explain these in detail.

Happy crafting, I’m headed back to the studio!

Kate

 

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Meet the Artist in Residence!

Hi everyone! I’m Katie Biddle. I’m an artist, princess, basket case, rebel… you get the idea. On this blog, I’ll be posting about the art I create and get the privilege to witness on a daily basis at Cal Poly SLO, both within the on-campus craft center and around San Luis Obispo. Check back often, and see what’s happening in the studio!

We’ll meet wonderful artists, view gorgeous art, and learn together – I can’t wait to begin this journey!